ESL jobs in China|Find a teaching english job(TEFL jobs) in China.

In ancient China,Guo referred to city or state.Zhonguo (now it means China) meant the central city or the central state. According to historical books, Zhongguo had five connotations: fist, the capital city; second, the state ruled by the emperor; third, the Central Plains; fourth, the upland region and last, the region dwelled by Han and Xia nationalities.

Since the Han Dynasty (206BC-220AD), people often referred the state established by the Han nationality as Zhongguo; however, other nationalities also call their own states as Zhongguo. Neither of them would acknowledge other Zhongguo.

Strictly speaking, Zhongguo in ancient times was an adjective rather than a proper noun. None reigning dynasties tookZhongguoas their name, and they all had their own titles.

After the 1911 Revolution (the Chinese bourgeois democratic revolution led by Dr. Sun Yat-sen which overthrew the Qing Dynasty), Zhongguo was taken as the shortened form of Republic of China. And in 1949, Zhongguo became the shortened form of the People’s Republic of China.

Now, the only one Zhongguo in the world is thePeople’s Republic of China with its capital in Beijing.

The China National Silk Museum, opened to the public in February 1992, is located in Hangzhou City of East China’s Zhejiang Province. It is a special museum dedicated to the exhibition of China’s more than 5,000 years of silk culture and history.

The museum completed renovation in September 2003 and has been open to the public for free since January2004.

 The “Display of Chinese Silk Culture” is the museum’s main display, divided into the Prelude Hall, the Display of Silk Stories, the Display of Silk Craft, and the temporary exhibition hall.

 The “Display of Chinese Silk Culture” won the Prize of Elaborate Works in the Sixth National Top Ten Museums (2003-2004) competition.

Nanjing Road, known as theNo.1 Street in China, is one of the leading business centers in Shanghai. It is referred to be the miniature of the history and culture of Shanghai for a century.

From the Bund at the east end to Jing’an Temple at the west end, the street has a history of more than 100 years. It was originally named Yongquan, the spring in front of Jing’an Temple.

The 1033-metre-long “Pedestrian Walkway of Nanjing Road” houses the China’s key commercial shops like Shanghai No.1 Department Store, Yong’an Commercial Building, Lao Feng Xiang Gold & Jewelry Shop, Maochang Optical Shop and Shanghai No.1 Medicine Shop. All these make Nanjing Road a thriving and fascinating commercial hub that attracts both local residents and visitors from at home and abroad.

Live in Shanghai,do ESL jobs here

Students inNanjing city, in east China’s Jiangsu province, will soon experience a fashionable way of study. They can leave heavy school bags at home, and take iPads into the classroom instead, as necessities such as books and papers will be replaced by the high-tech gadget.

On March 24, teachers at Jinling High School told senior high students who plan to study in the United States that all newly admitted senior three students will be required to use iPads in class once the new term begins in September. The policy, which has been discussed extensively online since the announcement, will possibly be extended to all the school’s students.

Xin Qihua, vice director of the international department of Jinling High School, said using iPads can set students free from the burden of school bags and it can also improve interaction between them and teachers, who can raise questions through the devices and review all answers from the students immediately.

Xin added that iPads can also give students access to many new foreign educational resources, which will contribute to their preparation for the SAT, TOFEL and AP exams, and it can help them spend up to 90 percent less on teaching materials.

The measure was hailed by many young people. Micro-blogger “secret cannot be told” posted on popular micro-blogging site Sina Weibo, “I am so jealous. I have an iPad too, but I am not even allowed to take it to the classroom.”

However, many people expressed doubt in the efficacy of the reform and some worried that it may have side effects on the students.

“Buzhiyubu” wrote, “Although it is worth trying, children who lack self-discipline may waste time in playing games.”

Meng Qun, a teacher involved in the program, said, “The teacher has technical control over all the iPads, and students will be prevented from installing any games.”

In an attempt to lighten the load on students in China’s primary and high schools, several local governments have recently been trying to expand the use of “electronic school bags,” a term which refers to mobile devices such as tablets and laptops.

However, Yin Fei, professor with Nanjing Normal University, said, “It is a fallacy to reduce students’ burdens by introducing electronic devices.The excessive burden on students’ shoulders is not from the weight of school bags, but the flawed educational system itself.”

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In the early 1900s, the Shikumen lanes were considered among the younger generation as the ultimate examples of dilapidated, crowded and wretched urban living. Luckily for the generations to follow, a few literary masterpieces were written by writers infatuated with the lane’s architecture which introduced people to the hidden beauty of Shikumen.

The Stone-hooped doors and Shikumen

In the Shanghai dialect, wrapping or bundling is called ‘hooping’, giving rise to phrases like ‘hooping a bucket’, so doors ‘hooped’ by stone bars were called Stoned-hooped doors, and later the name changed to Shikumen. Generally, the Shikumen-style buildings have long bars of stones as doorframes and burly wooden planks as doors, each fixed with a huge bronze ring.

The origin of Shikumen buildings can be traced back to the 1860s. In 1860, the Taiping Revolution led by Li Xiucheng advanced east, conquering a string of important towns in easternChina, causing an influx of refugees from southernJiangsuand northernZhejianginto the foreign settlements inShanghai. To accommodate this inflax of refugees, local merchants were encouraged to invest in housing for these people. To use the limited land more efficiently, the houses built were in most cases rows of Shikumen-style buildings

These buildings reflect a mix of Chinese and foreign styles of architecture. Shikumen-style buildings have certain elements of the west, but most of the design and layout is in line with that of the “Jiangnan” area of easternChina. Behind the Shikumen door is a courtyard, and further inside is a living room, locally known as a parlour, and then there is the back courtyard, kitchen and back door. To the sides of the courtyard and the parlo
ur are the right and left wing rooms. The layout of the second storey is similar to the one below, but above the kitchen is the garret, above which is a flat roof. The typical buildings of the Shikumen style can be seen within Xingrenli – an area of 1.33 square kilometers defined by the east side of Henanzhong Road, Ningbo Road and Beijing Road; and also within Dunrenli, Mianyangli and Jixiangli, all near the Xinmatou Street close to Zhongshannan Road.

After the early 1900s,Shanghai’s households became smaller in size and the residents’ living patterns underwent major changes. The structure and layout of the Shikumen-style houses also changed as a result. Smaller units, without wing rooms and suitable for small households, appeared, together with somewhat larger units with one parlour and one wing room. These new two-or-three-storey Shikumen houses were separated by lanes four meters wide. Humble “Tingzijian” rooms were found at the turn of the staircases while verandahs were added to the facades. After the 1920s, sewerage systems were installed. Typical examples of such Shikumen buildings are the Jingan Villa onNanjingxi Road, and the Daluxin Villa onShanyin Road.

After the 1930s,Shanghaifaced a housing shortage, so the owners of Shikumen-style buildings rented out some of the rooms. Since then most Shikumen-style buildings have had their original layouts altered and became mansions housing more than one family.

Life in the Lanes

Shikumen-style houses formed the basis of the “Li Long” (lane) community where private spheres and public spaces overlapped. In this community, everyone knew everyone else’s business. As the density of the community rose, some family activities were often moved to public spaces.

A valuable Architectural Legacy

At their peak, the Shikumen-style neighbourhoods numbered more than9000 inShanghaiand took up 60 per cent of the total housing space of the city. The Shikumen style, which has survived for more than a century, is however no longer suitable for modern urban living. Since the 1990s,Shanghaibegan a new wave of renovation and development, demolishing many Shikumen-style buildings. It was only when more and more of these houses were replaced by skyscrapers that people began to realize such monuments of Shanghai’s past deserve to be preserved.

Teaching Eng lish jobs in Shanghai

Senior police officers in Shanghai are taking English-language training courses to help them better deal with increasing numbers of foreign nationals in the city.

About 100 top-level officers from the city’s public security bureau and district bureau chiefs began their nine-month courses at the weekend.

“More and more foreigners are coming to work and live here, and this presents greater challenges for the city’s police,” said Guo Yonghua, deputy director of the Shanghai Municipal Public Security Bureau.

“The city’s public security departments have been looking to develop high-quality police officers to deal with the demands of foreign affairs.”

English-language training company (ESL jobs here)Wall Street English have developed a range of tailor-made courses, including “senior police officer English ability training”, “Shanghai police officer online English learning and social practice”, and “oral English corner”.

The courses focus on improving English listening and speaking skills, with native speakers providing one-on-one training. Trainees will do the courses in their spare time.

Chen Changjun, deputy director of the command center of the public security bureau, was one of 30 officers who took English training courses in 2009.

“I already had some foundation in English when I was in school, but I used it little after I graduated. This training gave me a chance to improve and helped me to better deal with daily work,” Chen said at the launch of the training program on Friday.

“As Shanghai attracts more people from overseas, so the city has to intensify its efforts to fight an increasing number of international crimes. There is a greater need for language skills,” Chen said.

The Luoyang Peony is China’s traditional and well-known flower. It always represents elegance and poise. With various varieties and marvelous colors, the Luoyang Peony enjoys the honor of “King of the Flower Kingdom” and “Luoyang Peony Ranking the First under Heaven”.

Throughout the city, you can see all kinds of peonies with colors ranging from red, pink and white to the rarest dark. When spring arrives, the whole city is soaked in the sweet smell of peony. In 1982, it was defined as the city flower of Luoyang and at the same time, a decision was made to hold an annual peony fair festival in Luoyang from April 15 to 25, concurrently with lantern shows and other forms of entertainment. During the festival, people from all corners meet inLuoyangto see the peonies and so the city livens up with a spectacle of seas of flowers and tides of people.

In April, you can enjoy yourself in the streets, onPeony Square, inPeonyParkandXiyuanPark. But the most famous place to view and admire the Luoyang Peony isWangchengPark.

Located on both banks ofJianRiveron the north side of the western reach ofZhongzhou Road,WangchengParkgains its name only because it is now on the relics of theImperialCityin the Western Zhou Dynasty. Covering an area of 67 hectares, it is the largest comprehensive park inLuoyang.

There is a zoo, peony yards, swimming pools and an under-ground exhibition room of the Han Tomb. In the peony yards on both sides of Jian River, there are thousands of rare and precious peonies named “”Yellow yao “and “Purple wei”. These two peony yards become the main spot of the annual peony fair.

The ancient architectural complex in the western part of the park fully displays the lingering charm of the Zhou’s architectural style. The tablet named Hetu and Luoshu is another attractive spot there. Hetu and Luoshu is a famous legend of ancient Chinese civilization. Some 6,000 to 7,000 years ago, a horse with a picture-scroll named Hetu on its back sprang out of the Yellow River, and an immortal turtle with a book named Luoshu on its back swam in theLuoRiver. Later, Fuxi, known as the ancestor of human beings, deducted the Eight Diagrams of Yin and yang (the positive and negative) and thus the universe was divided into two, the Heaven and the Earth. However, according to the doctrine of Luoshu, Dayu, the first king of the Chinese Nation, drew up a constitution named “Hong Fan Jiu Chou” to rule the country and from then on began the Chinese civilization. So during every Pure Brightness Festival-held in the 5th of the 24 solar terms, personages of various circles gather here to worship their common ancestors.

 Do ESL Jobs in Luoyang city

STEP 1: Decision making on details

How many budget you have, how large, buy or rent, whether houses or apartment, which district or specific area you prefer to live.

Gathering information through Internet, newspaper, magazine, among other media.

Have a basic concept of the prices for different housing types.

 STEP 2: Find an agency and the houses you like

Each agency will publicize houses they are consigned to rent or sell, you can pick up some among the total.

You should visit several outlets of those large and famed local chain agencies around the areas you preferred before make the decision.

 STEP 3: Check the house at the scene

Accompanied with one or two agent, you can visit the landlord and the house. Looking around as careful as you can and ask each question you want to know.

 STEP 4: Hire an agency

If you find your preferred houses and the agency which you can trust and rely on, you may hire the agency to rent or buy the house from its owner.

Those agencies will need you to sign a contract with them to restrict you contact directly to landlords.

 STEP 5: Bargain and sign contract with landlord through your agency

Both the leasing and purchasing contracts have their officially recommended version, you can adding some extra clauses after negotiating with your landlord.

You may bargain with landlord on the price and other extra conditions, such as repairing, renovation, fares (power supply, water, gas, and property management fee).

Make it clear on the responsibilities for taxation, fares (power supply, water, gas, and property management fee), repairing, among others.

 STEP 6: Go to local real estate exchange center for contract registration

 STEP 7: Pay deposit (for tenant) and get the key

Normally, you should pay the rent for the first month plus two months of rent as deposit before you move to your new home.

Remember, no matter buy or rent, registration is necessary, local agencies will do procedures for you or you can hire a lawyer to tackle them.

 ESL jobs in Shanghai

To the surprise of many, three-year-old Xuanxuan chose a book rather than an iPad when she was offered the two.

It’s admirable as many parents see it. They are upset by their babies’ obsession with iPad and TV.

Xuanxuan’s mother, Lu Xiaoling, fromNanjing, shared her experience online of turning her iPad baby to a book kind of girl.

She said she has bought her daughter more than 600 books at home.

“Unlike other children, Xuanxuan loves to read from the bottom of her heart and she asks me to read books for her every day,” said Lu. “The number of books may be huge for a child but most of the 600 books are what she likes and no one of them is forced by us adults for her to read.”

She also told the reporter that many of her friends’ children are iPad fans. When the adults meet, the children always “forget to eat or sleep” but playing with iPads all the time. She said it’s a result of parents’ guidance. As she thought TV is not good for the eyesight of children, her family would not watch TV at home after her daughter was born and iPad is also a no for her daughter.

All kinds of colorful picture books opened a new world for Xuanxuan. Her love for books has led Xuanxuan to quickly adapt to the life in kindergarten – she never cried. A kindergarten teacher appraised her as “giving, communicable and with her own thoughts”.

Xuanxuan’s story h|ԌE|Ԍts who are “enlightened” and say will make great efforts in fostering the reading habit for their children by reading books to them from then on.

 

As the biggest developing country of the world and the popular travel destination for numerous foreigners,China has a long history of more than 5000 years, which brings up the resplendently rich modern civilization. So,Chinais a great county with its own culture and civilization.

 What should you have to experience for your China tour, and what are the ones that can be mostly symbolize China, helping you know much more about China and its culture. 

Here, we list the top 10 Chinese symbols for your convenience, including, China Great Wall, China Giant Panda, Lantern, Beijing Opera, Jiaozi, Red Flag, Qipao, Knotting, Kungfu, Sedan Chair.

 1. The Great Wall

There is an old saying: “You are a real man until you climb up the Great Wall”, which reflects the Chinese People’s spirit of courage and persistance. TheGreat Wall of China, one of the greatest wonders of the world, was listed as a World Heritage by UNESCO in 1987. Just like a gigantic dragon, the Great Wall winds up and down across deserts, grasslands, mountains and plateaus. It is a remarkable piece of engineering and is the most famous symbol ofChina.

 2. China Giant Panda

The giant panda, regarded as one ofChina’s National Treasures, is on the verge of extinction. Today there are fewer than 1,000 giant pandas living in the world. The giant panda is the symbol of eco-environmental conservation. Visitors toChinacan see this reclusive animal inSichuanProvince’s Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding. We hope, with their cute faces, unusual beauty and grace, giant pandas can bring visitors toChinapleasure and enjoyment.

 3. Chinese Lantern

Lanterns play an important and irreplaceable role in Chinese long history and symbolize the brilliant culture ofChina. The art of lanterns, as the precious traditional culture of Chinese, is also inherited and continues among folks.

 The craftwork of lantern is still widely used in current society which can be seen in some happy days such as the Lantern Festival, wedding and celebration ceremonies. Besides, lanterns have some other functions in daily life. For example, at ancient time, when there was no electricity, lanterns were used as a tool of illumination, which brought great convenience to everyday life.

 4. Beijing Opera (Bianlian)

Beijing Opera is the quintessence ofChina. As the largest Chinese opera form, it is extolled as ‘Oriental Opera’. Having a history of 160 years, it has created many ‘firsts’ in Chinese dramas: the abundance of repertoires, the number of artists, opera troupes and spectators.

 The costumes in Beijing Opera are graceful, magnificent, elegant and brilliant, and mostly are made in handicraft embroidery. As the traditional Chinese pattern are adopted, the costumes are of a high aesthetic value.
The types of facial make-ups in Beijing Opera are rich and various, depicting different characters and remarkable images, therefore they are highly appreciated. Moreover there are numerous fixed editions of facial make-up.

 5. Chinese Jiaozi

Jiaozi (Chinese Dumpling) is a traditional Chinese food, and is greatly loved by most foreigners.

 Dumplings are one of the major foods eaten during the Chinese New Year, and year round in thenorthern provinces. Traditionally, families get together to make jiaozi for the Chinese New Year. In rural areas, the choicest livestock is slaughtered, the meat ground and wrapped into dumplings, and frozen outside with the help of the freezing weather. Then they are boiled and served for the Chinese New Year feast. Dumplings with sweet, rather than savoury fillings are also popular as a Chinese New Year treat.

 

6. Chinese Red Flag

The flag of the People’s Republic ofChinais a red field charged in the canton with five golden stars. The design features one large star, with four smaller stars in a semicirc
le set off towards the fly. The red represents revolution; the five stars and their relationship represents the unity of the Chinese people under the leadership of Communist Party of China (CPC). Sometimes, the flag is referred to as the “Five Star Red Flag”.

 7. Chinese Qipao

The cheongsam is a female dress with distinctive Chinese features and enjoys a growing popularity in the international world of high fashion. The name “cheongsam,” meaning simply “long dress,” entered the English vocabulary from the dialect ofChina’sGuangdongProvince(Cantonese). In other parts of the country includingBeijing, however, it is known as “qipao”, which has a history behind it.

 8. Chinese Knotting

Chinese knotting is a decorative handicraft arts that began as a form of Chinese folk art in the Tang and Song Dynasty (960-1279 AD) inChina. It was later popularized in the Ming and Qing Dynasty (1368-1911 AD). The art is also referred to as Chinese traditional decorative knots. In other cultures, it is known as “Decorative knots”.

 In February 2008, Corra Liew from Malaysia seek possibilities out from the traditional Wire Jewelry Making technique, Chinese knotting is then merged and presented in wire form. Corra addressed the technique as Wired Chinese Knot.

 9. Chinese Kungfu

Kung fu and wushu are popular terms that have become synonymous with Chinese martial arts. However, the Chinese terms kung fu and wushu have very different meanings. The Chinese literal equivalent of “Chinese martial art” would be zhongguo wushu.

 In Chinese, kung fu can be used in contexts completely unrelated to martial arts, and refers colloquially to any individual accomplishment or skill cultivated through long and hard work. In contrast, wushu is a more precise term for general martial activities.

 10. Chinese Sedan Chair

A sedan chair is a human or animal-powered transport vehicle for carrying a person, once popular acrossChina. It has different names like “shoulder carriage”, “sleeping sedan” and “warm sedan” etc due to the time, location and structural differences. The sedans familiar to modern people are warm sedans that have been in use since the Ming and Qing Dynasties. The sedan body is fixed in the wooden rectangular frames on the two thin log poles. The top and four sides of the seat are enclosed with curtains, with a chair blind that could be rolled open in the front and a small window on each side. A chair is placed inside the enclosed space.

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