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Senior police officers in Shanghai are taking English-language training courses to help them better deal with increasing numbers of foreign nationals in the city.

About 100 top-level officers from the city’s public security bureau and district bureau chiefs began their nine-month courses at the weekend.

“More and more foreigners are coming to work and live here, and this presents greater challenges for the city’s police,” said Guo Yonghua, deputy director of the Shanghai Municipal Public Security Bureau.

“The city’s public security departments have been looking to develop high-quality police officers to deal with the demands of foreign affairs.”

English-language training company (ESL jobs here)Wall Street English have developed a range of tailor-made courses, including “senior police officer English ability training”, “Shanghai police officer online English learning and social practice”, and “oral English corner”.

The courses focus on improving English listening and speaking skills, with native speakers providing one-on-one training. Trainees will do the courses in their spare time.

Chen Changjun, deputy director of the command center of the public security bureau, was one of 30 officers who took English training courses in 2009.

“I already had some foundation in English when I was in school, but I used it little after I graduated. This training gave me a chance to improve and helped me to better deal with daily work,” Chen said at the launch of the training program on Friday.

“As Shanghai attracts more people from overseas, so the city has to intensify its efforts to fight an increasing number of international crimes. There is a greater need for language skills,” Chen said.

After a city-wide effort to scrub too-literal English translations from street signs ahead of the 2008 Olympic Games, Beijing authorities are launching yet another linguistic rectification campaign – this time, targeting restaurant menus. CCTV’s Xie SiSi reports.

This may all look so yummy, but the menu might be a shock!

CCTV’s Xie Sisi said, “This Chinese menu was lost in translation. Don’t worry, meatballs don’t smile, ordering Chinese food can be so easy now with this book, so follow me.”

This Book – “Enjoy Culinary Delights: A Chinese Menu in English” was recently published to put an end to the often-too literal English translations seen on Chinese menus. It contains recommended translations for more than 2,000(2,158) ofChina’s most popular dishes.

China’s dish names are infused with its culinary culture, and expressing them in English is not always so easy.

Xie said, “Take this iconicSichuandish – Kung pao chicken for example. ‘Kung pao’ was an official title during the Qing Dynasty, and the inventor of the dish – Ding Baozhen possessed the title, so his title was used to name the dish.”

Foreign visitors inBeijingare welcoming the book.

The municipal government has tried to regulate English menus since 2006 and promoted the translations in more than 1,300 restaurants during the 2008 Olympic games.

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